breakingnews:

Coronal mass injection find could see ‘textbooks rewritten’
The Verge: NASA says it has made a discovery which will require “rewriting textbooks” after it found the two rings of charged particles surrounding the Earth - called Van Allen belts - were reconfigured by a coronal mass injection. Not only are the belts now believed to be more malleable, the mass injection revealed for the first time the formation of a third belt.
Photo: An image of a giant prominence on the sun before it erupted is captured on August 31, 2012, by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This may have been one of the causes of a third radiation belt that appeared around Earth a few days later. (Credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/Goddard Space Flight Center)

breakingnews:

Coronal mass injection find could see ‘textbooks rewritten’

The Verge: NASA says it has made a discovery which will require “rewriting textbooks” after it found the two rings of charged particles surrounding the Earth - called Van Allen belts - were reconfigured by a coronal mass injection. Not only are the belts now believed to be more malleable, the mass injection revealed for the first time the formation of a third belt.

Photo: An image of a giant prominence on the sun before it erupted is captured on August 31, 2012, by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This may have been one of the causes of a third radiation belt that appeared around Earth a few days later. (Credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/Goddard Space Flight Center)

Reblogged from breakingnews

breakingnews:

The remains of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong are committed to the sea during a service held onboard the USS Philippine Sea in the Atlantic Ocean.(Photo: Bill Ingalls / NASA)More on the service from NBC News here:http://nbcnews.to/RXuNKi

https://plus.google.com/+NASA/posts/5KmTaNV4oGg

breakingnews:

The remains of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong are committed to the sea during a service held onboard the USS Philippine Sea in the Atlantic Ocean.
(Photo: Bill Ingalls / NASA)
More on the service from NBC News here:http://nbcnews.to/RXuNKi

https://plus.google.com/+NASA/posts/5KmTaNV4oGg

Reblogged from breakingnews

discoverynews:

They used a toothbrush to repair one of mankind’s most ambitious science projects ever.
Astronauts are boss.
Spacewalking Astronaut ‘Touches’ the Sun

In legend, the bright sun was a dazzling temptation for Icarus and so, too, it is for NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, who appears to touch our closest star in a photo snapped during a spacewalk this week.
Astronauts Williams and Hoshide spent six hours and 28 minutes working to remove a stuck bolt using improvised tools made from spare parts, including a  toothbrush.

reach out…

discoverynews:

They used a toothbrush to repair one of mankind’s most ambitious science projects ever.

Astronauts are boss.

Spacewalking Astronaut ‘Touches’ the Sun

In legend, the bright sun was a dazzling temptation for Icarus and so, too, it is for NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, who appears to touch our closest star in a photo snapped during a spacewalk this week.

Astronauts Williams and Hoshide spent six hours and 28 minutes working to remove a stuck bolt using improvised tools made from spare parts, including a toothbrush.

reach out…

Reblogged from discoverynews

guardian:

Photograph: ISS/NASA
One of the fascinating shots in our monthly gallery of images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites:

The city of Shanghai (right) sits along the delta banks of the Yangtze river along the eastern coast of China. It is the world’s most populous city (the 2010 census counted 23 million people, including “unregistered” residents). With so many humans, the city is a tremendous sight at night. The bright lights of the city centre and the distinctive new skyscrapers that form the skyline along the Pudong district (the eastern shore of the Huangpu river, a tributary of the Yangtze that cuts through the centre of Shanghai) make for spectacular night viewing both on the ground and from space. On the left is Suzhou located 120km from Shanghai

guardian:

Photograph: ISS/NASA

One of the fascinating shots in our monthly gallery of images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites:

The city of Shanghai (right) sits along the delta banks of the Yangtze river along the eastern coast of China. It is the world’s most populous city (the 2010 census counted 23 million people, including “unregistered” residents). With so many humans, the city is a tremendous sight at night. The bright lights of the city centre and the distinctive new skyscrapers that form the skyline along the Pudong district (the eastern shore of the Huangpu river, a tributary of the Yangtze that cuts through the centre of Shanghai) make for spectacular night viewing both on the ground and from space. On the left is Suzhou located 120km from Shanghai

Reblogged from guardian